Super-readable YA - The Family Tree

Paperback

An utterly stunning, powerful and unforgettable novella by the highly acclaimed and much missed Mal Peet. Featuring sensitive full colour illustrations by talented rising star, Emma Shoard.

When a man returns to his childhood home and visits the derelict tree house in which his father once chose to live, he recalls the past unravelling of his family, the unspoken strangeness of their lives, and the impact on his own adult life. Beautiful, sparse and insightful storytelling. Particularly suitable for struggling, reluctant or dyslexic readers aged 14+

RRP: £7.99

ISBN

978-1-78112-805-3

Publication Date

15-05-2018

Format

Paperback

Pages

88 pages

Dimensions

146x200mm

Product Description

An utterly stunning, powerful and unforgettable novella by the highly acclaimed and much missed Mal Peet. Featuring sensitive full colour illustrations by talented rising star, Emma Shoard.

When a man returns to his childhood home and visits the derelict tree house in which his father once chose to live, he recalls the past unravelling of his family, the unspoken strangeness of their lives, and the impact on his own adult life. Beautiful, sparse and insightful storytelling. Particularly suitable for struggling, reluctant or dyslexic readers aged 14+

Author

Mal Peet, Illustrated by Emma Shoard

Mal Peet was a multi-award-winning novelist best known for his young adult fiction, including Keeper, Tamar, and Life: An Unexploded Diagram. His novels were nominated for and won several awards including the Carnegie Medal, the Branford Boase Award, and the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize. In 2017 his final novel Beck was shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal. Mal passed away in 2015.||Emma Shoard is an illustrator and printmaker who graduated in 2011 from Kingston University’s Illustration & Animation course. She also works part-time as a bookseller for Daunt Books. Emma has twice been longlisted for the Kate Greenaway Medal for her work on Siobhan Dowd’s The Pavee and the Buffer Girl and Mal Peet’s The Family Tree.