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Primary maths tool

Simple online tools to help you with maths! There is a short description of what each tool will help your child to do, as well as instruction on how to use it. Click on the links below to get started.

Counting tool

What does it do?: Assist with counting from 1-20

How to use: The main screen shows a scene to which you can add characters. Click and drag the characters form the dock at the bottom of the screen to add them to the scene.

Any unwanted characters can be dragged into the bin, or you can click ‘clear all’ to remove all characters from the scene.

The cards to the right of the scene automatically update with the number of characters on screen. The top two cards count the individual characters, and the bottom cards count the total number of characters in the scene. You can display or hide cards by clicking on the arrow on the bottom right of the cards.

Clicking the different scenes in the dock on the bottom right of the screen will cause the scene and the characters to change. The number of characters in the scene will then reset to zero.

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the counting tool

Tree Tool

What does it do?: Use real-life objects to practice addition and subtraction

How to use: This tool opens to show a meadow. Click on the pull-down menu at the bottom left to add trees to the meadow. To populate the meadow and trees, drag items from the dock underneath. Any unwanted items from the dock can be dragged into the bin. To remove all items from the meadow, click the ‘Clear all’ to the right of the dock.

Clicking Reset undoes any changes you have made and returns the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Tree tool

Dice tool

What does it do?: Demonstrate the concept of probability or use the tool in conjunction with activities which require dice

How to use: The main screen shows animations of dice. The Roll Dice control allows you to roll the dice.

Click Set up to choose the number of dice to display on screen, the type of dice (how many sides each dice has), whether they display numbers or dots, and the number ranges for these.

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Dice tool

 

KS1 Number Line

What does it do?: Use the number line to assist with counting and calculations

How to use: The tool opens with a 0-10 number line. On the left there is a pair of frog markers (one hidden underneath the other). These can be dragged around the number line, and the distance between them is marked by a small animated frog which hops. One frog marker has a green arrow, the other has a pink arrow. The animated frog always hops from pink to green. On the right there is a stack of snail markers. These can be dragged to mark points along the number line, but are independent of each other.

‘Set up’ opens a menu in which you can add up to 2 more number lines, and choose the scale properties of each. You can also choose whether only the start and end values are labelled, or the start, end and increments.

The scale properties are:

  • start value – the lowest number in the line
  • end value – the highest number in the line. It must be greater than the start value (but it does not have to be positive).
  • increment – this is the gap between the labelled points along the number line. It must work with your chosen start and end values: these determine the range of the scale, and the range must be a multiple of your increment (example – a 0-20 number line has a range of 20. It can have an increment of 20, 10, 5, 2 or 1, but not 3 or 7). Note also that you cannot have more than 100 increments (example: if you have a -100 to +200 line you have a range of 300 and your increment must be at least 3).
  • sub-divide – this is the gap between the unlabelled marks within an increment. The increment must be a multiple of this number. You cannot have more than 100 sub-divides in your line.
  • frog begins allows you to specify the starting position of the green and pink frogs.

 

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state

 

Click here to use the KS1 Number Line tool

 

KS2 Number Line

What does it do?: Use the number line to assist with counting and calculations

Objective of the game: Provide positional directions

How to use:

The tool opens with a 0-10 number line. On the left there is a pair of round, green markers (one hidden underneath the other). These can be dragged around the number line, and the distance between them is marked with “hops”. On the right there is a stack of square, orange markers. These can be dragged to mark points along the number line, but are not connected to each other.

‘Set up’ opens a menu in which you can add up to 2 more number lines, and choose the scale properties of each. You can also choose whether only the start and end values are labelled, or the start, end and increments.

The scale properties are:

  • start value - the lowest number in the line
  • end value – the highest number in the line. It must be greater than the start value (but it does not have to be positive).
  • increment - this is the gap between the labelled points along the number line. It must work with your chosen start and end values: these determine the range of the scale, and the range must be a multiple of your increment (example - a 0-20 number line has a range of 20. It can have an increment of 20, 10, 5, 2 or 1, but not 3 or 7). Note also that you cannot have more than 100 increments (example: if you have a -100 to +200 line you have a range of 300 and your increment must be at least 3).
  • sub-divide - this is the gap between the unlabelled marks within an increment. The increment must be a multiple of this number. You cannot have more than 100 sub-divides in your line.

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the KS2 Number line tool

Spinner

What does it do?: Demonstrate the concept of probability and making a calculated estimate

How to use: The tool opens to show a spinner with 6 segments called ‘Label 1’ - ‘Label 6’. You can rename these by typing over the existing names (either on the spinner or on the data chart).

You can change the number of segments by using the Segments drop-down menu at the bottom right.

You can change the colour of segments by clicking on the colour picker next to the name of each segment in the data table.

Click the ‘Spin’ button to spin the pointer. Results are recorded in the data table. Below the ‘Spin’ button is a drop-down menu with which you can choose whether one click of the ‘Spin’ button performs 1, 10, 100 or 1000 spins.

The ‘Show data table’ button on the bottom right lets you control whether the data table is shown, or is hidden.

Use the ‘Clear results’ button under the data table to delete your existing spin results without undoing changes you have made to the number of segments or their labels.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes all changes and returns the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Spinner tool

 

Number cards

What does it do?: Display sets of numbers and calculations on movable number cards

How to use: The tool opens to show an empty work area onto which you can drag the cards from the stack in the bottom left corner.

Any unwanted cards can be dragged into the bin. Or click ‘Clear all cards’ to delete them all.

You can flip any individual card over (to hide/show its value) by clicking on the arrow on the bottom right of the card. You can flip all the cards by clicking the ‘Hide all values’ and ‘Show all values’ buttons.

By default, there is a stack of 20 blue cards labelled 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,…….20. Once you have dragged a card onto the work area, you can over-type its value with something else.

If you need more than 20 cards, or if you want to change the colour or the sequence of numbers on the cards, you can slick the ‘Set up’ to open a menu to do this. You can also set whether cards start with the value hidden or shown.

Changes made in ‘Set up’ do not affect cards already in the work area. So you can, for example: drag cards 1, 2, 3…. 10 onto the work area, change to orange cards showing Roman numerals, drag I, II, III, IV….. X onto the work area, and then ask the children to match the pairs of cards bearing the same number.

Clicking ‘Reset’ returns the tool to its default state – undoing any changes you have made in ‘Set up’ and deleting all the cards in the work area.

 

Click here to use the Number cards tool

 

Place value

What does it do?: Explore how multiple-digit numbers are made up of millionths, hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands, thousands, hundreds, tens, units, tenths, hundredths and thousandths

How to use: The tool opens to show an empty board and a dock. The dock contains cards for the different place values from millions (M) to thousandths (th). You can drag cards out of the dock and onto the board.

By default, all the cards show “1”. You can adjust this using the arrow buttons under a given card. For example, to make a card saying “500” click the up-arrow under the hundreds (H) card until the card in the dock reads “5”. Then you can drag it onto the board.

To make a number with a digit in more than one place value: To make “111” (for example), drag one Hundred card, one Tens card and one Ones card onto the board so that they are on top of each other. A handle appears to the left of this stack of cards: use this if you want to drag “111” around the board. Dragging on another part of the stack of cards drags 111 apart, thus demonstrating partitioning.

Drag any unwanted cards into the bin to delete them.

If you want fewer place values in the dock (e.g. you only want to show Tens and Ones), click on the ‘-’ button to the left or the right of the available places. This hides the outermost place. If you have hidden some places, ‘+’ buttons appear so that you can show them again when wanted.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Place value tool play

Base ten

What does it ?: Demonstrate the relationship between units, tens, hundreds and thousands

How to use: The tool opens with an empty screen onto which you can drag Base 10 blocks from the dock on the left. The dock contains:

  • Single cubes (to represent ones)
  • Rods of 10 cubes (to represent tens
  • Flats of 100 cubes, as a 10x10 sheet (represents hundreds)
  • Blocks of 10x10x10 cubes (represents thousands)

Clicking the ‘Show total’ button reveals the total number of units currently on screen (click again to hide this information).

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

Click here to use the Base ten tool

Bead sticks

What does it do?: Assist with counting, and show the relationship between thousands, hundreds, tens, units, tenths, hundredths and thousandths

How to use: The tool opens to show three bead sticks – for ones, tens and hundreds. You can add beads to these sticks by clicking on the coloured bead under the appropriate stick. You can remove single or multiple beads by dragging them to the bin, or remove all the beads by clicking ‘Clear all’.

By default, the number of beads on each stick is shown as a numerical display. You can show or hide this by clicking ‘Show all values’.

You can add more sticks to the left (e.g. to add a thousands stick) by clicking the ‘+ stick’ button on the left. Similarly, you can add more sticks to the right (e.g. to add a tenths stick_ by clicking the ‘+ stick’ button on the right. The ‘- stick’ buttons remove the nearest stick. You cannot remove the ones stick or the black decimal point to its right.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes all changes and returns the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Bead sticks tool

 

Fractions

What does it do?: Demonstrate fractions visually and display the accompanying numerical fraction, decimal, ratio or percentage alongside the pictorial fraction

How to use: The tool opens showing a fraction in bar form. Click the ‘Show fraction’, ‘Show percentage’, ‘Show decimal’ or ‘Show ratio’ buttons to reveal what this fraction is when written in these various forms. Click again on any button to hide this information once more.

To alter the numerator of the fraction, either click on parts of the bar, or click the top pair of arrow buttons next to ‘Show fraction’. Use the lower pair of arrow buttons to alter the denominator.

Clicking ‘Set up’ opens a menu in which you can display up to 3 more fractions, and display them in circular form (including using a pizza or cake background image if wished) or in grid form (including a chocolate bar background if wished).

Clicking Reset undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Fractions tool

Fraction wall

What does it do?: Demonstrate fractions visually with the fully customisable fraction wall

How to use: Add and subtract numbers mentally

How to play: The tool opens to show a fraction wall with six rows. You can drag the bricks out of their starting rows and into any other row.

Click the ‘Hide’ button next to a row to hide its labels.

Click the up or down arrows on the left to alter the size of the fraction displayed in a row (for example to alter the 1/3 row to show 1/2, click the down arrow. Click the up arrow to make it show 1/4.

You can choose the number of rows in the wall by clicking on the drop down menu at the bottom of the screen.

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Fraction wall tool

Snake fraction tool

What does it do?: Demonstrate fractions visually with the fully customisable fraction snake

How to use: The tool opens with a fraction snake made up of 6 blocks. You can drag any of the blocks from the snake and move them around the screen.

Clicking Set up opens a menu where you can change the number of blocks of the snake, and the colour of each block.

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

Click here to use the Snake fraction tool

Number square

What does it do?: Demonstrate and explore counting and number patterns

How to use: The tool opens to show a 1-100 number square. You can hide the numbers either by clicking the arrows on the left and bottom edges, or by clicking on individual numbers. Click again to show hidden numbers.

The ‘Hide all’ button hides all the numbers with one click, and clicking the ‘Show all’ button shows them all.

Click the ‘Colour square’ button at the bottom left to change from showing/hiding numbers. When this is selected, clicking on the arrows or on individual square will cause rows or columns or individual squares to be highlighted in a colour. Click again to remove the colour. The ‘Clear colours’ button becomes available once some squares are coloured: this removes all colouring with one click.

You can change the colour by clicking the colour picker next to the ‘Colour’ button.

Clicking ‘Set up’ opens a menu in which you can alter the number of rows or columns, or the start number.

Clicking Reset undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state

 

Click here to use the Number square tool

Multiplication square

What does it do?: Demonstrate and explore multiplication and number patterns

How to use: The tool opens to show a 1-12 multiplication square. You can hide the numbers by clicking the arrows on the left and bottom edges, or by clicking on individual numbers. Click again to show hidden numbers.

The ‘Hide all’ button on the bottom right hides all the numbers with one click, and clicking the ‘Show all’ button shows them all.

Click the ‘Colour square’ button at the bottom left to change from showing/hiding numbers. When this is selected, clicking on the arrows or on individual square will cause rows or columns or individual squares to be highlighted in a colour. Click again to remove the colour. The ‘Clear colours’ button becomes available once some squares are coloured: this removes all colouring with one click.

You can change the colour by clicking the colour picker next to the ‘Colour’ button.

Clicking ‘Set up’ opens a menu in which you can alter the number of rows or columns.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Multiplication square tool

Function Machine

What does it do?: Demonstrate one- and two-step calculations with this animated tool

How to use: The tool opens to show one function machine. Enter a number in the flashing input box on the left, then click ‘Go’ for the number to be processed by the machine. The input and output are recorded in the data table.

The function machine has arrow buttons. Those on the left change the operator (cycling though plus, minus, multiply and divide). Those on the right change the number (clicking the up arrow cycles through the series 1,2,3,4,...9,10,20,30,40...100, then back to 1; clicking the down arrow cycles through these values in the other direction).

By default, the function is displayed. There are two ‘Hide’ buttons on the function machine. Click these to hide the operator or the number, or both.

Buttons at the bottom left of the screen let you choose between ‘One machine’ and ‘Two machines’. When there are two, the second machine processes the output of the first.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Function machine tool

Beads and laces

What does it do?: Create repeating patterns with the beads and laces tool

How to use: The main screen shows two hands holding a string, to which you can add beads to make a pattern. Drag the beads from the dock at the bottom onto the string.

Clicking on the pull down menu labelled ‘1 lace’ will allow you to change the selection to 2 laces.

Clicking ‘Clear all’ will remove all of the beads from the laces.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

Click here to use the Beads and laces tool

Symmetry

What does it do?: Demonstrate lines of horizontal, vertical and diagonal symmetry on a range of 2D shapes

How to use: The tool opens to show a square. You can draw lines of symmetry on this shape. If you get this right, your line becomes a black dashed line. You can then demonstrate folding the shape along this line by clicking the ‘Fold’ button. You can then click the ‘Unfold’ button to unfold the shape again.

If you draw a line somewhere other than on a line of symmetry, your line will flash before disappearing.

If you click ‘Show Lines’, the tool will show all the lines of symmetry for this shape.

To replace the square with another shape, click on a new shape from the selection on the left of the screen.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Symmetry tool

Pattern tool

What does it do?: Create patterns and sequences of shapes and design a jumper

How to use: This tool opens to show a jumper. Click on the coloured square at the bottom left to change the colour of the jumper. Drag shapes from the tabbed dock below the make patterns on the jumper. Any unwanted items from the dock can be dragged into the bin. To remove all shapes from the jumper, click the ‘Clear all’ button above the bin.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Pattern tool

Shape set

What does it do?: Use the shape set to compare 2D and 3D shapes

How to use: Drag 2D and 3D shapes onto the main screen from the dock at the bottom. Click into a shape and use the square boxes to resize the shape, or the round boxes to rotate the shape. You can also re-colour the shape by clicking on the coloured square at the bottom left of the screen. To arrange the shapes in relation to one another, you can choose the ‘Bring to front’ or ‘Send to back’ buttons. You can add as many shapes to the screen as you like.

Any unwanted shapes can be dragged into the bin, or you can click ‘Clear all’ to remove all shapes.

You can add sets to the screen by clicking ‘Add set’. Click into the set and use the square boxes to resize the set, or the round boxes to rotate the set. Click the set label to rename the set and hit ‘update’ when you have renamed it. You can add as many sets to the screen as you like.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Shape set tool

Geometry set

What does it do?: Use the ruler, protractor or set square to measure lines and angles

How to use: The tool opens with a 180-degree protractor. Click and drag on this to move it around. Double-headed arrows appear around it when you click - click and drag on these to rotate the tool.

Click the buttons ‘Show protractor’, ‘Show ruler’ and ‘Show set square’ to show or hide these geometry tools.

You can drag shapes out of the dock at the bottom of the screen to measure them. Remove unwanted shapes by dragging them to the bin.

Clicking ‘Set up’ opens a menu where you can choose:

  • 180-degree OR 360-degree protractors
  • 30/60/90-degree OR 45/45/90-degree set squares.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Geometry set tool

Carroll diagram

What does it do?: Demonstrate how to classify and group data with this sorting tool

How to use: The tool opens to show an empty, unlabelled Carroll diagram. This can be populated by dragging items from the dock underneath. The tabs within the dock allow you to choose the items to drag into the diagram. Any unwanted items on the diagram can be dragged into the bin. To remove all items from the Carrol diagram, click the ‘Clear all’ button above the bin.

You can edit the title and labels by clicking on ‘Click to insert title’ and on the word ‘label’.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made and returns the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Carroll diagram tool

Venn diagram

Who does it do?: Demonstrate how to classify and group data with this sorting tool. Import images to give a real-life context

How to use: The tool opens to show a Venn diagram with two overlapping circles. This can be populated by dragging items from the dock underneath. The tabs within the dock allow you to choose the items to drag into the diagram. Any unwanted items on the diagram can be dragged into the bin. To remove all items from the Venn diagram, click the ‘Clear all’ button above the bin.

The diagram and the sets and subsets can be labelled by clicking on the word ‘label’ or ‘Click to insert title’.

Click on the pull-down menu at the bottom left to change from ‘2 circles overlap’ to a different arrangement of circles.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made and returns the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Venn diagram tool

Pictogram

What does it do?: Demonstrate the creation and interpretation of pictograms

How to use: The tool opens to show a pictogram with 12 bars, each capable of showing up to 10 images. The default image is a bicycle and the default key for the bicycle is 1.

You can enter data either by clicking on the pictogram, or by typing in the data table. Type in the data table to rename the bars.

To label the X axis or the whole chart, click on the existing label (e.g. “Click to insert title”) and type your label.

You can hide the data table or the chart by clicking on the Show pictogram and Show data table buttons at the bottom right (click again to show the chart or table).

Clicking ‘Set up’ opens a menu in which you can change:

  • The image
  • The number of bars
  • The key value (change whether one image indicates 1,2,3...10 items)
  • The end value of the scale (this must be a multiple of the key value)
  • The start value must be 0.

The key value and the scale must be compatible - for example, if your end value is 7, you cannot have a key value of 2 or 4 (or any other value except 1 or 7) because it will not fit the scale. Similarly you can have a key value of 1,2,3,4 or 6 on a scale with an end value of 12 because all those key values fit into the scale exactly.

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Pictogram tool

Bar charter

What does it do?: Demonstrate the creation and interpretation of bar graphs

How to use: The tool opens with an empty bar chart and data table. You can enter data either by dragging the bars up or down on the chart, or by typing in the data table. You can hide the data table or the chart by clicking on the Show bar chart and Show data table buttons at the bottom right (click again to show the chart or table). Click on the colour swatches in the data table to change the colour of a bar. To label the axes or the whole chart, click on the existing label (e.g. “Click to insert title”) and type your label.

Clicking Set up opens a menu where you can change the number of bars on the x-axis, or change the y-axis scale.

The settings for the y-axis are:

  • start value - the lowest number possible within the scale
  • end value – the highest number possible within the scale (which must be positive, and greater than the start value)
  • increment - this is the gap between the labelled points along the scale. It must work with your chosen start and end values: these determine the range of the scale, and the increment must fit within this range an exact number of times.
  • sub-divide - this is the gap between the unlabelled marks within an increment. The increment must be a multiple of this number

The default y-axis, for example, has start = 0, end = 100, increment = 10 and sub-divide = 1.

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Bar charter tool

Pie charter

What does it do?: Demonstrate how to create and interpret pie charts with this dynamic data tool

How to use: The tool opens to show a pie chart with 4 equal slices. You can alter the names and value of these by editing the entries in the data table. At the bottom of the data table is an ‘Add slice’ button for adding a further slice - you can then change its title and value as appropriate. A chart can have up to 12 slices. Clicking the ‘Show %’ button shows the slice values as percentages (click again to hide this). The percentages cannot be edited, but will update automatically if you alter the value of any slice.

The ‘Clear all data’ button deletes all the entries in the data table. There are also ‘Show chart’ and ‘Show data table’ buttons which you can click on and off to hide the chart or the data (without deleting them).

Clicking ‘Set up’ opens a menu in which you can change how the chart itself is labelled.

Clicking ‘Reset’ returns everything to the default settings: you will lose any data you entered, and any changes to the labels of your chart.

 

Click here to use the Pie charter tool

Line grapher

What does it do?: Demonstrate the plotting and interpretation of line graphs with this dynamic data tool.

How to use: The tool opens to show a graph with x and y axes of 1-100. Add points by clicking on the graph, or by typing in the data table. You can label the axes and the whole graph by clicking on the existing ‘click to label..’ titles.

You can hide the graph or the data table by un-checking the ‘Show data table’ and ‘Show line graph’ buttons.

Clicking ‘Set up’ opens a menu in which you can configure the tool.

  • You can have two separate lines on the graph.
  • You can change one or both axes to have units in text rather than numbers. Text axes are initially labelled ‘label 1, label 2...’ etc. and you over-type these to change them to your required text values (e.g. March, April, May, June...). Each label must have a unique name - you cannot have two labels called ‘Monday’ (you can have ‘Mon 1st’ and ‘Mon 8th’).
  • By default, the Y-axis is the same as the X-axis. You can change this by unchecking the button ‘Same as X-axis’
  • You can change the units on numerical axes. The settings for numerical axes are:
      • start value - the value where this axis crosses the other one
      • end value (which must be positive, and greater than the start value)
      • increment - this is the gap between the labelled points along the axis, and must fit a whole number of times into the scale
      • sub-divide - this is the gap between the unlabelled marks within an increment, and must fit a whole number of times into the increment

    The default y-axis, for example, has start = 0, end = 100, increment = 10 and sub-divide = 1.

    Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Line grapher tool

Money

What does it do?: Practise counting money, or doing calculations involving money

How to use: When first opened, this tool has “a dock” of £(GBP) at the bottom. You can drag coins and notes onto the main part of the screen from here. Any unwanted money can be dragged into the bin. Click on the €(Eur) or $(US) tabs of the dock if you want to add money in Euros or US dollars. The “Hide all money” button hides what is on the screen (click it again to reveal). Clicking Reset undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Money tool

Clock

What does it do?: Demonstrate the features of analogue and digital clocks, and explore time

How to use: The tool opens with the 12-hour analogue clock. You can move the hands by dragging them. There is a control initially labelled “Analogue” by the 5 o’clock mark - click on this to choose another kind of clock. If you choose a digital clock, you can alter the time on it by clicking the up and down arrow buttons.

The Set up menu allows you to choose to display up to 4 clocks at a time, and to choose whether these display seconds.

Clicking Reset undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Clock tool

Thermometer

What does it do?: Demonstrate how to measure and record temperature, using either Fahrenheit and Celsius scales

How to use: The tool opens to show a thermometer which measures 0 to 100 Celsius. Alter the temperature shown by dragging the slider bar to the right of the thermometer. Clicking the ‘?’ button underneath the slider reveals the current temperature (click again to hide this information). Underneath the bulb of the thermometer is a control to alter the scale on the thermometer - click and then select another scale from the menu.

Click the ‘Add thermometer’ buttons to the left and right of the screen to add up to 2 more thermometers.

Click the black ‘X’ on any thermometer to hide it.

‘Set up’ opens a menu in which you can opt to display only the start and end values on the thermometer scale, or have a fully-numbered scale.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Thermometer tool

Capacity

What does it do?: Demonstrate how to measure capacity with this range of animated water containers

How to use: The tool opens showing a graduated container which can be filled (by clicking on the top tap) or emptied (by clicking on the bottom tap). To stop a tap filling or emptying, click the tap again. You can choose to display the scale on the container in litres or millilitres by clicking on the buttons next to the top tap. The dock on the left hand side shows a range of containers from a 100ml beaker to a 75-litre paddling pool. To replace the container in the main screen, click on your choice of new container in the panel.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Capacity tool

Weighing

What does it do?: Demonstrate weight by weighing objects of different masses on a range of animated weighing scales

How to use: The tool opens to show a set of kitchen scales. Weights, or everyday items, can be dragged onto the scales from the dock on the left. Unwanted items can be dragged into the bin, or all items cleared from the scales by clicking ‘Clear all’.

By default, the kitchen scales show 10 kg in 0.25 kg. This scale can be changed by clicking on the button under the kitchen scales, and selecting another value from the menu.

Use the buttons at the top right of the screen to choose between the kitchen scales, a 2-pan ‘Libra’ balance, or a digital weighing machine.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Weighing tool

Nets

What does it do?: Explore the nets of 3D shapes such as cones, cylinders, cubes, cuboids, prisms, pyramids and prisms

How to use: The main screen shows animations of 3D shapes. A video player control allows you to play/pause an animation in which the shape rotates in different planes and folds and unfolds, so as to show both the 3D shape and its net. You can scroll through the animation so that you can easily show key points.

Click Set up to choose different shapes, and whether 1 or 2 shapes are shown on the main screen.

Clicking Reset undoes all changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Nets tool

 

Rotate and reflect

What does it do?: Demonstrate the rotation and reflection across a horizontal, vertical and diagonal mirror line of a range of 2D shapes

How does it work: The tool opens to show an empty 10 x 10 grid onto which you can drag shapes from the dock at the bottom of the screen. Shapes that are on screen can be dragged around, or rotated by dragging the double-headed arrows which appear when the shape is selected. Any unwanted shapes can be deleted by dragging them into the bin.

Click on one of the buttons at the right of screen to position a “mirror” across the middle of the screen: horizontally, vertically or on either diagonal. Only one mirror can be used at a time - any new choice replaces your old one. Click the ‘Reflect’ button to reflect everything on screen in the current mirror.

Click the ‘Show grid’ button to hide the grid (click again to show it once more).

Clicking Reset undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Rotate and reflect tool

Geoboard

What does it do?: Join the dots to depict shapes, routes between two points, to draw nets or to make patterns

How to use: The Geoboard tool opens with 1 shape on the board. The shape behaves like an elastic band – you can click and drag any point of the shape’s perimeter to change the shape. You can add up to 2 more shapes to the board, by clicking the Show Shape buttons at the bottom of the screen. To delete a shape, click its Show Shape button again.

Clicking Reset undoes any changes you have made, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Geoboard tool

Co-ordinates

What does it do?: Create and interpret labelled co-ordinate grids, in one, two or four quadrants

How to use: The tool opens to show a ‘one-quadrant’ graph, covering points (0,0) to (10,10). Select the ‘four quadrant’ button bottom left to switch between this and a graph covering (-10,-10) to (10,10).

On the left there is a set of tools - the ‘add line’ tool is selected by default. With this selected, you can make lines by clicking on the chart to indicate the start and end points of the line. The co-ordinates you enter then appear in the data table. There is a colour picker next to the ‘add line’ tool - you can use this to change the colour of the line.

Click on the top-most tool (the ‘add point’ tool) to add isolated points (these will not be part of a line). Or, click on the bottom tool for an eraser with which to delete individual points or lines.

To delete all points on the graph, click the ‘Clear all data’ button under the data table.

Use the buttons under the data table to hide or show the chart, the data table, or both.

Clicking ‘Set up’ opens a menu in which you can choose background maps - e.g. a treasure map.

Clicking ‘Reset’ undoes all changes, returning the tool to its default state.

 

Click here to use the Co-ordinates tool